Category Archives: Science/Engineering

Montana glaciers refuse to melt

Climate scientists have been revising their predictions of Montana glacier disappearance regularly since 1941. They have to. The damn thing refuses to pay attention to global warming/climate change. They’ve revised it recently to 2044, “which is almost a century later than the original forecast,” says Tony Heller of realclimatesciences.com.

It’s like the supposed death of the polar bears. Which also hasn’t happened no matter how fat Al Gore’s bank account continues to grow.

Via Ricochet

Chernobyl: More fic than fac

The HBO series, which recently ended at five episodes, plays mighty loose with the facts, according to Forbes enviro writer Michael Shellenberger.

No Soviet helicopter crashed flying over the burning reactor; the firefighter’s wife losing her baby because it absorbed the radiation meant for her never happened nor could it; most of the firefighters survived; and the danger of exposure to radioactive bodies is minimal.

So, if we can believe this critique, the HBO series employed massive amounts of dramatization, i.e. lies. Midnight in Chernobyl is much better, if far less sensational.

Not to be outdone, the Putin government’s Cultural Ministry has set out to televise “the tale of a heroic KGB agent trying to thwart a supposed CIA sabotage plot” at Chernobyl.

Yeah, that’ll show ’em. Combating lies with more lies.

Via Forbes & PJMedia

America’s hottest oil field

It’s, ta-da, Midland-Odessa in the Permian Basin of West Texas. Thanks to Trump. No Dim would have done it.

“Fortunes are being made in this fracking-related gold rush, and money and workers are flooding in. But many necessities in the area now cost a small fortune, creating opportunities for businesses selling everything from dipping tobacco to sand for fracking. It can be hard to get a haircut, grab a plate of good Texas barbecue, or find a table at a popular bar, because demand outstrips supply. Housing is scarce and hotel room prices sometimes rival those of New York City at more than $500 a night.”

Via WSJ

Chernobyl

HBO’s picked another winner in Chernobyl, a fic-doc I suppose you could call it. Many of the details are real while the overall story is fiction.

The death of a young fireman ordered to fight the reactor fire is particularly poignant, his radiation exposure so intense that it literally is eating away his face. And his young wife steadfastly holds her lover’s hand. His highly radioactive dead body must be buried in concrete.

Of course you know the story, but you don’t. Not the lies of the Socialist dictatorship or the heroism of the ordinary people and their ultimate despair.

A good alternative to watching the show is a new book on the subject I’m liking so far.

A friend under the knife

An old Talmud-study buddy (when we were Black Pots together) goes under the knife today for a risky scoliosis operation to relieve his back pain. I don’t know what the odds are but it has the possibility of rendering him paralyzed or a vegetable. So prayers are in order and I ask you to drop one for him when you get a chance.

UPDATE: Good news. See comments.

Try, try again

Israel will try once more to land a robot craft on the moon.

“The 5-foot-tall Beresheet 1, the world’s first privately funded moon lander, crashed into the moon while attempting a landing [April 11] Apparently, a technical glitch caused its main engine to stop mid-landing.”

The second attempt could take 2 to 3 years to get ready. If at first you don’t succeed…

Via UPI

Fly By Wire

William Langewiesche anthropomorphizes airplanes.

In this book, it’s the Airbus A330 that landed on the Hudson River ten years ago. Having disgorged its passengers and crew safely, it was just “driftng nose high like a beast in the water, and refusing to die.”

Good story-telling, and good tech and flying skill, by the son of Wolfgang, author of Stick and Rudder, a classic book on the art of piloting.