Category Archives: Science/Engineering

When Lindbergh crossed an ocean

Speaking of anniversaries, today’s the 90th one of Charles Lindbergh’s solo, nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean. My father was five and my mother was three.

Lindbergh always maintained that he wasn’t alone because his high-wing, single engine monoplane was more than a thing. “We,” he titled his best-seller on the trip.

Via Power Line Blog

Lifting the Arctic drilling ban

“‘Trump to OK new offshore plan, reverse Arctic, Atlantic bans: sources,’ said a headline from S&P Global Platts, an industry trade publication….

“Oil for the people. Money from leases for the Treasury. And getting out of the Middle East for our military.”

That last may be iffy now, with the Syria strike, but it is to be devoutly wished.

Via Don Surber

Austin company bids on border wall

Black Security Products LLC has already built about 30 percent of the current fencing along the border. Now they want to do a concrete wall topped with a fence and an elevated platform to serve as a road.

“’It’s like a bridge,’ said Neusch, who shared the conceptual drawings for his bid with the American-Statesman. ‘It’s part of our design for the border wall.’ While he wouldn’t give cost estimates, he said the structure, with the additional steel lane for Border Patrol vehicles to drive on while they patrol, wouldn’t come cheap.”

Via Austin American-Statesman

DH-4 at Benbrook Field

Undated but World War I-era group photo of a DeHaviland DH-4 at Benbrook Field, southwest of Fort Worth. These were British biplanes used by us and them in the war and later by us as U.S. Airmail birds. Via Benbrook Public Library.

Interstellar

This Matthew McConaughey space story is a good one, discounting the time talk which gets a little mystical at, uh, times. And confusing. But if you just roll with the punches, it carries you along nicely. Even the almost three hours passes swiftly.

Loved the school principal and teacher emphasizing the rewriting of textbooks to eliminate the Apollo missions, including the landings on the moon. Settled science and politics, as it were. For the good of the people, don’t you know.

The Expanse 2

Roughly a year after watching the first season of this syfy concoction, I have embarked on season 2. It has three more episodes than 1.

The graphics, the hardware and the CGI are still cool. And the actors the same—even to the introduction of Bobby Draper, who is comelier than my mind’s eye view of her from the books, but that’s show biz.

Still worth the pittance it costs, $2.99 per 40-minute episode. And I see that it is making enough money from its 600,000 fans to go into production for a season 3. All to the good.

The continuing corruption of science

“…[NOAA] the world’s leading source of climate data rushed to publish a landmark paper that exaggerated global warming and was timed to influence the historic Paris Agreement on climate change.”

Under Barry Hussein’s watch, of course.

From James Delingpole: “What the whistleblowing NOAA insider John Bates has just done is prove beyond reasonable doubt what some of us have long claimed: that from NASA GISS and NOAA across the pond to the UEA and the Met Office’s Hadley Centre, the world’s leading temperature data sets have been hijacked by climate activists and abused to advance a political agenda.”

Scientists are corrupted by government funding, without which they cannot survive, as it comes with a stipulation to be politically correct. Or else. It’s part of the swamp Trump needs to drain. The question is how to do it?