The problem with executive orders

President Trump is continuing to issue executive orders rolling back regulations that adversely affect business/education.

“The president canceled the ‘Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces’ rule, which blacklists companies from receiving federal contracts if [they] have violated labor rules in the past, the ‘Planning 2.0’ rule, which dealt with how to use 245 million acres of federal land and was opposed by the energy industry, and two regulations under the ‘Every Student Succeeds Act,’ which Trump said removes ‘an additional layer of bureaucracy to encourage freedom in our schools.’

“As he signed the orders, Trump said there was ‘a lot more coming’ and he would ‘remove every job killing regulation we can find.’”

“[These] resolutions of disapproval reached the president’s desk through the Congressional Review Act, a rarely used tool that allows Congress to fast-track bills to reverse regulations. Before Trump, the law had been used successfully only once in its 21-year history,” says USAToday.

The major problem with these resolutions and executive orders, as opposed to legislation, is getting them enforced. The Weekly Standard: “Signing an executive order is the beginning of a process. not just the end of one…[the president and agency heads must] persuade the bureaucracy to do the work—to neither obstruct nor slow-walk the process.” So every resolution and EO will have to be followed up, a lengthy process at best, which could fully occupy one staffer doing nothing else.

And the rarity of success of these “resolutions of disapproval” are an invitation to lawsuits and judicial micromanaging. So we probably haven’t heard the end of these.

Via Instapundit.

One response to “The problem with executive orders

  1. “And the rarity of success of these “resolutions of disapproval” are an invitation to lawsuits and judicial micromanaging. So we probably haven’t heard the end of these.”
    You’re exactly right Stanley. But the left has done everything in it’s power to undermine the “law” as enacted by Congress throwing it to the Courts that they think they will control. Everything must start with the enforcement of the “will of the People” as expressed through the acts of Congress.